rosemary, that’s for remembrance…the masked months #5

There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray, love, remember.— Hamlet

The very first post I wrote for this blog, way back in 2014, was about the poppy installation, and the crowds it drew, at the Tower of London. 888, 246 ceramic poppies to commemorate the British and Commonwealth lives lost in the First World War, 100 years after this so-called war to end all wars began. 6 years on and what a different world this is, not least because the gathering together in crowds to remember is not just not possible, it is illegal.

Today is November 11, and at 11:00 we will all stop and observe a two- minute silence. At least I think we will. It is hard to know what society at large is doing in these days, with everyone told to stay at home and away from each other. 3 days ago was Remembrance Sunday, an occasion the British take very seriously and do very well. Churches overflow, soldiers young and old march and wreaths are laid, poems are read and a single trumpet plays the haunting Last Post. Solemn crowds gather to take part in it all. A few moments of unity in a fractured world. But not this year.

I live across from a cemetery in which there are several war graves. One in particular can be seen from my neighbours’ bedroom window. He has become ‘their’ soldier and on Remembrance Sunday they clean and place flowers on his grave. Not this year. They fled London at the first lockdown and have not returned. With no services or ceremonies to attend, I took a long walk through the cemetery on Sunday, curious if any of the graves had been tended. They had not.

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In 2018, I visited an extraordinary art installation at Olympic Park, Shrouds of the Somme. Artist Rob Heard devoted 4 years, and bankrupted himself in the process, to sewing an individual shroud for each and every British and Commonwealth soldier killed and not recovered at the Somme. 72, 396 men lost, 19,240 on the first day alone (July 1, 1916). Each doll was only the size of a Barbie, but laid side by side, there seemed to be no end to them. Too many to fit in one photo. At the time, the sheer scale of it staggered me. It still staggers, yet in 2020, looking back at the photos, I feel something different, something I would never have thought only months ago: Look at them all, they aren’t alone.

Westminster Abbey was given special permission to hold a service today, with only 80 people, all masked, in attendance. I watched it on television and, while beautiful and moving, it felt all so very lonely. Remembering can be a deeply personal and often private act. Yet, this remembering, remembering for people most of us never knew, who died and continue to die, in the collective event that is war, seems to require, indeed deserves, a collective remembering. Even more so now when so many physical memorials have become problematic, the gathering of warm bodies seems more appropriate than cold stone.

These memorials we have insisted on erecting for centuries, do they really help us honour and remember? Sometimes, but mostly we just ignore them. They become part of the fabric of the landscape, no more distinguishable than the other stone and metal around them. I have been visiting English cathedrals recently, buildings that are filled with memorials and tombs and statues, mostly to people I have never heard of, whose deeds are either forgotten or, worse, are not worthy of being remembered. Occasionally, however, I find one that stops me in my tracks. In the east end of Canterbury Cathedral, a single candle and a fresh red rose sit on the floor as memorial to Thomas Beckett, the Archbishop of Canterbury murdered in the Cathedral in 1170. The simplicity is profoundly moving in a way an elaborately carved tomb or shrine could not be. It boasts nothing but its light, a light that is shared with all who look on it.

Not long ago I was introduced, through the Poetry Exchange podcast I have mentioned before, the Carol Ann Duffy poem, Last Post, which imagines what would be ‘if poetry could truly tell it backwards’, and allow ‘several million lives still possible’, what would be if, through verse, blood runs back into wounds and ‘and all those thousands dead /
are shaking dried mud from their hair / and queuing up for home.’ If only. With this poem and the Beckett memorial at Canterbury in mind I crossed the road, this morning. I spent time with these young men killed in the First World War. I tidied up their graves, lay a red rose and instead of a candle, a spring of rosemary at each. I said their names out loud, Frank, age 24, Harry, age 25, Percy, age 28. For just a few moments, together.

artemisia, i am…the masked months #4

Still waiting the official, final results of the US election, but certainly feeling better now than I did 36 hours ago. I was never optimistic enough to believe in the Biden landslide some were predicting, but neither did I expect to get up, after a rather restless and sleepless night, on Wednesday with the outcome still somewhat in the balance and that horrible man and his ilk baying for victory. I felt sick. And sad. And worried. It was also our last day before lockdown #2, so no time to be spent on what might be, no matter how frightening. First stop the boxing club, not least because exercise is an excellent mood changer, even better when that exercise involves punching things. 12 Rounds Boxing is club is across the way from Clapham Junction, between a bank and a chicken shop, up the blue staircase. Owned and run by women it trains boxers of both genders and offers non-contact fitness classes using the skills and discipline of boxing training. Techniques and combinations on the bag mixed with HIIT class favourites (planks, squat jumps, mountain climbers etc). I am a terrible boxer. My leg work is slow and awkward and my hands lack precision and speed. I rarely find any sense of rhythm. But what I don’t have in talent I make up for in enthusiasm. I absolutely love it. I smile the whole time, even through the burpees which I hate. By the end I am a puddle of my former self with smile intact. Rather like a sweatier version of the Cheshire Cat.  Yesterday I was positively transformed. The US was going to have to sort itself out, I, and my new mind set, had a date at the National Gallery.

The most popular woman in town at the moment, and the name of everyone’s lips, is hanging out at the National Gallery: Artemisia. Artemisia Gentileschi. Tickets are like gold dust. In what now looks like a stroke of genius, yesterday was my day for the exhibition, an incredible pre-lockdown treat. And she did not disappoint. I see a lot of art. I see a lot of art that I love, that impresses me, that stays with me. Artemisia’s work does all that and more. She blows me away.

And who is she? Born in Rome in 1593 and trained by her father, Orazio, Artemisia was one of the most successful and sought after painters of her day, not only in her native Italy but in Spain and England as well. She used herself as model and a painting by her, prominently signed by her with her likeness captured within it became not only a desirable status symbol for collectors but a very clever bit of self-promotion. The creation of self as brand, way before Warhol. Equally as remarkable, Artemisia is thought to be the first woman to prosecute a man for rape, after she was attacked by her father’s studio assistant, Agostino Tassi, when she was 17. A transcript of the trial remains, and is included in the exhibition, with the details of the physical torture she endured under questioning. The outcome is somewhat vague, with most historians agreeing that Tassi was found guilty but evaded punishment. Immediately following the trial, Artemisia married, moved to Florence with her new husband and launched a career that included the powerful Medici family and Charles I of England as patrons.

She fell out of history, as so many female artists do, until she was ‘rediscovered’ in the 20th century, but a rediscovery that has required no modern-day myth making. Everything we say about Artemisia today was said about Artemisia then: her ability to capture light, to portray emotion, to ferment a scene down to its essence. Her heroines are not ambivalent, neither are they coy. Her Judith’s are fierce, her Susannah’s are terrified, her Mary Magdalene is so powerfully self-possessed it seems contemporary, her Christ Child’s chubby little hand against his mother’s face is more tender in its realism than thousands of other similar scenes. Artemisia paints women as they really are, not as fantasy or societal norms dictate, full of strength and fear and love.

My favourite painting of all, however, is not a heroine or a goddess or a saint, but the muse of painting as a self-portrait, Self Portrait as the Allegory of Painting. Purchased by Charles I, and now in the Royal Collection, I saw it years ago at the Royal Academy’s exhibition of Charles I’s collection and it has stayed with me. It captures the muse of painting painting herself. It is not only beautifully executed: the light, the fabrics, the position of the hands, that swaying skull necklace!, but it is the truth of it that overwhelms me. A painting of painting painting herself as herself. WOW.  I am, it says. I AM.

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In these turbulent times, and maybe times have always been turbulent, there is something so extraordinary and powerful in those two words, they really (excuse the pun) pack a punch!  I AM.

hope is a thing with leaves…The masked months #3

I am acutely aware of what day it is today, which is why I am writing about something else.

2020 should have been the year of so many, many things, including the Year of Pilgrimage for UK cathedrals (43, including the Isle of Man), complete with a little blue passport and so many unique art installations to enjoy. I had hoped to spend much of the year on trains visiting as many as possible. I do love a cathedral, a cathedral with contemporary art even more. Alas, Covid came and cathedrals, like everything else, shut up tight. Since restrictions were relaxed, and the dissertation turned in, I have been trying to make up for lost time. Since the horrific terrorist attack at Nice Cathedral, in France, last week, I feel there is an urgency to reclaim, as quickly as possible, the power and majesty of these sites.

With a new lockdown looming (2 days to go) I will spread the writing of these recent adventures out. But today I can still write in real time, about today in Lichfield, a small city just north of Birmingham. I first became aware of Lichfield Cathedral at a conference I attended a few years ago about using contemporary art in cathedral settings. What was immediately obvious was that Lichfield needed no advice, in fact they seemed to be leading the way. With their own artist in residence, sculptor Peter Walker, and a very supportive Dean, Lichfield engages its community continually with a variety of projects from child-centered installations to light shows to sculpture. I chose this day to visit because both Peter Walker’s new ‘The Leaves of the Trees’ installation, in response to the Covid crisis,  and the Poppy Fields, an immersive sound and light experience, in anticipation of Remembrance Day next week, are on display. Or they were, anyway. I arrived at Lichfield, a gorgeous little Tudoresque town of American dreams, to learn that Poppy Fields 2020 had been cancelled thanks to the impending lockdown. And the cathedral was closing early. However, with the kindness of Verger Chris, I made the most of my 75 minutes.

Dedicated to St. Chad, the first Bishop of Lichfield, the Cathedral was built in 700, with additions through the centuries. Badly damaged during the English Civil War, sword marks are still visible on some of the now faceless stone carvings in the blind arcades, others worn by exposure after the roof collapsed, the Cathedral was rebuilt and restored by Bishop Hackett almost immediately following the restoration of the monarchy in 1661. As was their wont, the Victorians left their mark, including a rather stunning metalwork screen, lots of new heads for the arcades and an intricately carved reredos in the Lady Chapel.

Walker’s metal leaves, each one stamped with the word Hope, fan out across the floor in an area otherwise dedicated to military engagements that are less comfortable to 21st century sensibilities.

The juxtaposition is interesting, the suggestion perhaps that we, like the building itself, are constantly having to rebuild and realign ourselves. Not to erase the past but welcome in the new, to allow a blending of then and now in order to create an atmosphere that resonates with today. The reality of what was with the optimism of what can be. Or better yet, the reality of what is with the hope of what is. The long lasting effects of terrorism and Covid, the potential outcome of the US election, the re-evaluation of history, the timeless persistence of kindness and love. I thought of the lines from the John O’Donohue poem I saw on the Tube, this morning, ‘Try, as best you can, not to let / The wire brush of doubt / Scape from your heart / All sense of yourself’

As I stood in the otherworldly, dusky light and the thoughtful stillness of the Cathedral I knew it to be a place where wire brushes, if not forbidden, were at least kept at bay. It was a good day to be there.

Here we go again…Masked months #2

Well Boris is sending us back into lockdown. Not a surprise, really, but there seems to be very little enthusiasm for it this time round. Or much trust that we aren’t entering an endless cycle of lockdowns. So grateful I took full advantage of the museums when I could, even if the experience had, at times, a surreal quality to it. Last week, I tagged along when my youngest went to do some sketching at the Tate Britain for a GCSE art assignment. As my daughter filled her notebook with Henry Moores and Barbara Hepworths and the fabulous Sarah Lucas chair, I roamed the almost empty building. Aside from a handful of other solo wanderers, the only other visitors were young people sketching sculpture, for the same assignment, I presume. While it should be lovely to have a museum almost to myself, and little makes me happier than to see young people engaging with art, it became depressing rather quickly. The Tate is a buzzy place. Well it was anyway.

Happily, the Steve McQueen Year 3 project is still on display and spending time with all those smiley, gorgeous children is a great mood booster. McQueen, artist and film maker best known for Oscar winning 12 Years a Slave, photographed every Year 3 class in London, 76,000 children in total,  in 2018, and hung the pictures all the way up the walls of the Duveen Galleries. McQueen’s installation shows, in real time, what London looks like now, what it will look like in the future, in all its beautiful diversity.  Year 3 educates 7 & 8 year olds, an age when most haven’t learned yet to be self-conscious and posed, so the children are smiling broadly and openly. So many rays of sunshine in these unsettled and unsettling times.

Over the recent half-term break, this same daughter and I visited the Royal Academy Summer (now Winter) show. A dizzying mix of work by both the famous and the undiscovered,  the professional and the amateur, the established and the enthusiast. As always, a fabulous combination of the coveted and the confusing in art. It was nothing, however, compared to the Young Artists’ Summer show featuring works by 5-19 year olds on the other side of the building. The creativity, the skill, the imagination, the referencing, the reworking, the sheer talent…I was overwhelmed.  In only its second year, the judges received almost 18,000 submissions and somehow were able to choose 500 to showcase on the walls and on-line.   Like McQueen’s installation, it filled me with some much needed optimism. These kids just keep on keeping on, extraordinarily, no matter what.

Unfortunately, the feeling didn’t last…as we made our way out of the Royal Academy courtyard a large group of recently made-redundant RA employees, young adults all, were gathering for a little protest. Youth and young adult unemployment is at its highest level in almost 5 decades. Resources and opportunities were stretched before the shocker that is 2020, now they have evaporated. Never mind their ability to keep on keeping on, what kind of future are we offering  young people to  keep on with? At least the schools are staying open, in the UK.

Bruce Nauman, the American conceptual artist known for his neon signs and provocative installations, has a retrospective on at the Tate Modern. No surprise that my sixteen year old son liked Nauman’s claustrophobic cage within a cage most of all. Made in 1974, today it looks like pure lockdown in a windowless room.  The so-called new normal, but a lifestyle that surely cannot be sustained.

My London Passion: The Masked Months…#1

I had been thinking about reprising the My London Passion blog for several days now, My London Passion: The Masked Months. It has been three years since my final, 100th post, when I decided it was time to move on. And time moved on at quite the pace. Until suddenly, in March 2020, it stopped. Or rather time didn’t stop but we did, frozen in a strange and disturbing lockdown existence. In September, when the restrictions remained eased and the children were finally, finally, finally allowed back to school and I emerged from the basement having been typing away on a dissertation for months, blinking in the sunlight, I re-engaged with the world as much as legally possible and started up my London adventuring with a passion. Why not share it? So, I spent several mornings typing away, but nothing seemed to flow. Then came a message from a dear friend since teenage years. She wanted me to know that overnight her house had been vandalized and covered with death threats and homophobic slurs. Her older son is a ballet dancer and happens to be gay.

Remember way back in the Spring, at the beginning of the Covid crisis when along with the fear and the frustration there was also a sense of hope, a belief that we were going to emerge from the crisis a changed earth, a changed people,  with clean oceans and smog free skies and endless, reciprocal acts of kindness? A world in which peace would guide and love would steer…well, alas, that Age of Aquarius never really got dawning, did it? Violence, anger, greed, viciousness and fear have made spectacular comebacks. It makes you want to howl at the moon. And look at art. Not necessarily for any sort of explanation or redemption, but because sometimes the best thing art can do is initiate a gathering of shaking heads, a collection of sighs, an acknowledgment, once again, of how exhausting and debilitating hate is.

Theaster Gates, a Professor at the University of Chicago, is an artist of so many mediums and talents it is impossible to describe his practice succinctly, except to say he can and does pretty everything. He was to show at the Covid-cancelled Frieze this Autumn; however White Cube made his installation available to the public at their Bermondsey street gallery. Entitled, Sweet Square of Dark Abyss, it includes a series of books, outdated (one hopes, anyway) American history books, the contents of which Gates responded to with poetry and subsequently re-covered and re-titled with the poems. Within the work Nump, is this pair, my favourite, which reads: LET ME BE / OH LORD, LET ME BE

I thought immediately of a poem I was introduced to during Spring lockdown through the excellent Poetry Unbound podcast. ‘The Book of Genesis’ by Kei Miller, a Professor at the University of Exeter, which imagines a world in which our sole influence is the word LET.  Not ‘allow’, which suggests some level of power structure, but LET, a word through which anything can happen. What would a world be like if we could just let each other be, to dance, to write, to paint, to love, to live, just as we are, just as we can become.

‘Suppose there was a book full only of the word,
let – from whose clipped sound all things began: fir
and firmament, feather, the first whale — and suppose
we could scroll through its pages every day
to find and pronounce a Let meant only for us —
we would stumble through the streets with open books,
eyes crossed from too much reading; we would speak
in auto-rhyme, the world would echo itself — and still
we’d continue in rounds, saying let and let and let
until even silent dreams had been allowed.’

Within the shock and horror my friend, her family and her entire community are experiencing a new solidarity has emerged. The outpouring of support and kindness has been, well, as it should be, enormous. I have a postcard of the Bob and Roberta Smith piece, What Unites Human Beings Is Huge And Wonderful, in a frame, in my home. The original is written on two large doors.  Even in its reduced size it is a big message, one we all need to be reminded of every day. Especially on days when hate comes in its unfortunate disguise as a spray can.

On Ray Lewis, Jasper Johns and London…the last one 100/100

davSo here it is. The 100th post. I thought this project would take 2 years.  It has taken almost 3. But, as John Lennon is credited with saying, “life is what happens while you are busy making other plans.” And wow is that true. For better and for worse. The world is quite a different place than it was 3 years ago. Terror, Trump, Brexit, Corbyn, North Korea, to name but a few. But no need reiterating the obvious, let’s get to 100.  But how? What could possibly be the topic of the final scribbling? This is London, so the possibilities are endless…but it has to be right. A clear finish, a final wrap up.  The universe, who keeps me on a short leash, got tired of listening to all this self-indulgent angst and said:  “OK.  You want a final post, well hold on tight. I will give you a weekend so full of experiences and thoughts and connections, there will be a cats cradle of interwoven threads when it is done.” And so it was. And here it is.

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Several weeks ago the Cathedral asked if I would be the guide for some VIPs when the professional American football team, the Baltimore Ravens, came to town. Would I ever! Not because I follow celebrities, I am pretty clueless about most. And not because I know anything about American football, because I don’t. But because I love, feel it my raison d’etre, to show the Cathedral off to fellow Americans. Sure, I am delighted to show round any and all nationalities, but I especially enjoy the Americans. Because only the best of my country come to the Cathedral. The best of the best. It makes me proud. I have met amazing Americans. Of all ages, regions, ethnic backgrounds, interests and lifestyle cofchoices.  They are people whose existence I want to be reminded of as often as possible, particularly of late, when so much of not-our-best seems to be on permanent display. The one thing all these visitors have in common is curiosity. Intellectual curiosity. A dying virtue. So, on Friday, there I was. No surprise, the Ravens’ VIPs were terrific. Jonathan Ogden and Ray Lewis, Hall  of Fame players both. I took these lovely gentlemen and their sizable entourage on a tour of the American Chapel and the Quire, which they seemed to enjoy very much. But upon leaving the Quire, Bill Viola’s video art installation Mary caught Ray Lewis’s eye….and despite the efforts of the handlers, I had to speak. It had stopped him in his tracks, after all.  It is piece that I feel passionately about. The essence of human life, in cofsome ways.  As I gushed away about why this work is so relevant for us today, I could actually see the instant (it didn’t take long) when Mr. Lewis got it. I mean he really “got it.” That beautiful moment when you are talking about art and you see the spark in the other person. Not only was he charming, interested and curious, he got the Bill Viola. Honestly, I have the best job in the world. I floated out of the Cathedral.

And onto more art. Not ready to go home,  I popped into the RA for a preview peek of the Jasper Johns retrospective. Another American. And one who is without question one of the best of the best. At the first glimpse of his Target, I almost wept. It was the perfect carry on from the morning. Concrete, or rather paper and paint and objects, proof that not all is broken in my native land. That there is still greatness. And Johns is great. One of the greatest.  So much of his work is about seeing and, a rather loaded word these days, perceiving. How we perceive the world matters. Johns is a master at asking us to look at the familiar with fresh eyes. cofHis art invites us to look again, “let go of habits of perception and see things in a new way.” In today’s ever polarized society, these are almost fighting words. Oh yeah…and Johns is perhaps most famous for his American flags. A symbol, once again, mired in controversy. But that is Sunday….

As if Friday hadn’t been full enough I had one more engagement. Theatre. The Ferryman by Jez Butterworth. I have a  complicated relationship with Mr. Butterworth’s work, but this is a play about the cycle of  violence of the IRA (though they certainly don’t have the monopoly on this most damaging of issues.) The acting was excellent, despite someone walking off stage due to illness in the 3rd act and the understudy having a broken hand. Add a real but unhappy goose, a pocketed bunny, and an unusually placid baby into the mix and I admit I did wonder if health and safety had had a chance to look round. But the message of the play was clear. This world is a disaster thanks to our own doing. Ever thus. And on to the next.

davHaving just turned 49 I have given myself the challenge of running 50 races or running events before turning 50. Almost immediately I realised this was a challenge of dedication and logistics rather than athleticism.  Or so I thought. The first 5 races were rather fabulous. The 6th, Sunday morning, 10k in Hyde Park. The weather was glorious. One of those perfect, warm London autumn days. The location could not have been more beautiful. Hyde Park, in the sunshine. And the race, sponsored by a Crohn’s Disease charity, was well organised.  But my legs weren’t in it. They were tired and tight and every step hurt. Every very slow step. It is true that there is no run you regret. But there are runs that disappoint. This was one.  Alas.  Life often disappoints.

But a slow run is really not something to fuss about. I went home via Marble Arch, for a little trip down memory lane. Because it was here, just off Marble Arch that I lived for 3 months in the Winter of 1989 while attending LSE.  Art and theatre, theatre and art is davhow I spent most of my time. What had always been an ember burst into flame over those months. I was hooked. No wonder many, many years later, for reasons that have nothing to do with me at all except for exceptionally good taste in a husband, I was back. Art, theatre and everything that London has to offer. While revelling in nostalgia I noticed the new  sculpture, Celebration of Life, by Bushra Fakhoury. Dancing with naked, masked abandon. Yup, that is it. But I couldn’t linger for long as I had promised to take the kids to the Colourscape on Clapham Common.

Colourscape, an annual music festival “of unusual instruments and sound,” since 1989, the same year I first lived in London.  The wait was so long I sent my children to find conkers. Conkers aren’t just so English, they aren’t just beautiful symbols of Autumn, they keep moths at bay. I need them. Stephen and Katherine returned with two bulging mdesacks. Very pleased. But while alone in the slow moving queue, social media started to implode. Ray Lewis had dropped to his knees during the American national anthem at Wembley Stadium.  And people on both sides of the issue went wild. Insane. Out of their minds. With hate. So much hate. He seemed to have suddenly become the most reviled person in the world. No small feat these days. Everybody, from all sides, was baying for blood. Yikes. And the language being used, again, from all sides of the argument was unacceptable. Utterly unacceptable. Ugly, ugly ugly stuff. I was mulling over how much I would not like to be famous when we finally made it to the top of the queue. And those thoughts were put on hold.  We stepped into  Colourscape and time evaporated. We were literally cocooned in colour and sound. Strolling musicians at every rounded turn. So peaceful and beautiful. Yet the shifting colours made me feel unsteady. The experience, as lovely as it was, was unsettling, disorienting. Such is life, isn’t it. Unsteady even at the best of times. When I got home I switched on the television to watch the opening ceremony of the Invictus 10631274_949261878433867_4232479405504663826_o (2)Games, the Olympic-style games for wounded service people, an event close to my heart.  (see post #96.)  The overriding message, or series of messages, of the long weekend fell into place.  No one, Prince Harry reminded the audience, would have wished to be eligible for these games. Yet here they are.  The keynote speaker before him,  a man who had been attacked with an axe by the Taliban, said that no one thinks it is going to be them, until it is. And the competitors all spoke, after they crossed the finish line, of having made a choice, a choice, sometimes against all odds, to keep going. To keep going when life if horrifically, cruelly or even just irritatingly, interrupted. Real life happens as you’re busy making other plans.

davMy gorgeous, fabulous, wonderful sister in law, who I have known since we were teenagers, has breast cancer. The devastating recent hurricanes and floods and earthquakes. The seemingly unbreakable cycles of violence. The idolization of symbols and causes and slogans over the simple act of caring for one another. The hate. It is enough to set the Black Dog howling. And here I come with my tiny little banner of hope. Call me naive or even stupid, though I prefer the epitaph that a lovely elderly Indian visitor to the Cathedral gave me, “most excellently cheerful.” Perhaps that is why I was brought back to London. Because in this greatest of all cities I will never ever be lacking in things to inspire, to be curious about, to fill me with crazy, passionate joy. Not just the big stuff, and lucky me, I have plenty of big stuff, but the little moments too. Sharing a great piece of art with someone who gets it. Running, slowly, past a Henry Moore sculpture. An uncrowded art gallery. Conkers. A bassoon player appearing round a colourful corner. Theatre with friends and yeah, being followed round by photographers at St Paul’s cathedral is pretty great too. I love them all.

So, having reached 100, writing about my adventures has come to an end. What have I learned? I am very American, in all the best ways. I love London, really, really love London. I am the luckiest person alive. And having adventures, every day that I can, with enthusiasm and joy and passion, that is what I do.  My London Passion. Thanks for sharing it with me.

@mylondonpassion

On Being a Woman Phenomenally…running into the next decade…99/100

cofBirthdays are a funny thing. They are supposed to be meaningful, monumental even. But I’ve always found them to be rather like New Year’s Eve, overhyped and ultimately disappointing. And as we get older, depressing. A few days ago I turned 49. “Oh, its the beginning of the end,” people told me. “The big 50 next year…it’s  all downhill from here.” and other such ridiculous nonsense. “But why?” has been my consistent answer. Why should it be depressing and downhill and the end? I am so looking forward to turning 50. I have long thought that my 5th decade is going to be my best yet. 50 and fabulous. 50 and fighting fit. 50 and fearless. And technically this is my 50th year, so why not start celebrating now. I don’t generally do much birthday celebrating. Instead I use it as an excuse to do more Londony things, as if I ever need an excuse for Londony things. Last year I stretched it out and did a full week of Londony things with different people, IMG-20170908-WA0004including breakfast in the Sky Garden with Sara, sculpture walk with Milly and drinks in the London Eye with my husband, Craig. But this year I wanted something a bit more. Not expensive, fancy more. Not exclusive London more. Not once in a lifetime more…just me more. As in how I see the future. And would remember forever. A tall order, perhaps, but my passions are widespread and I know clever people. One of the cleverest is Vanessa, the woman behind the amazing Secret London Runs running tours. “I might like to run on my birthday,” I said to her back in June. Almost without hesitation came the response, “why don’t I write a Famous Annes of London tour.” Why not indeed.

But this wasn’t just a super fun run in honour of my famous London namesakes, with Philippa and Alice and Vanessa, it was a flamboyant start to my year long pre-50th celebration. Yes, year long.  If I want to celebrate for a year, why not. It’s my beginning of the beginning. (Most certainly not the start of the end!)

 

So at 6:10 pm on the 7th of September, 2017, my 49th birthday, Alice, Philippa and I met Vanessa at the Duke of Wellington statue outside of Bank station for an adventure through the City, the West End, Soho and Camden.  Along the way Vanessa introduced us to the most wonderfullyIMG-20170908-WA0010 colourful and interesting Annes. Naughty, powerful, rich, talented and sainted. We saw where Anne Bronte met her publisher, who was of course expecting a man, not a provincial young lady. We admired a statue of Shakespeare and agreed that being left his second best bed in the will didn’t mean he didn’t care for his wife, Anne Hathaway…she got the money too.  Poor Anne Askew was racked so badly for her religious beliefs she had to be carried in a chair to the stake, to be burned alive for heresy. Anne Redshawe ran The House of Intrigue in the 18th century, a lesbian brothel frequented by ladies of the upper classes. Anne Morrow LinIMG-20170908-WA0016dbergh, Queen Anne, and her mother Anne Hyde all have great stories. St. Anne, Jesus’s granny, got two stops. The second included oznoran extraordinary mural. Art! Plus a few more Annes (I can’t give all the secrets away!).

By the time we arrived in Camden, tired but full of happy history, Craig, Ange and Paul had a table waiting and wine cooling. The evening rolled on. The laughter rang out. It was the BEST birthday ever!!

But that was just the start. Shortly after we came up with the plan for the Anne run, I decided it would just be the first of….well….50. To prove that I am not afraid of turning 50 by literally running into it…..50 times. That is the challenge I have set myself, to run 50 races or events (of course Secret London Runs will feature often in this experience!) in the year. So after each one I will have either a medal (I do love a bit of bling) or some fab photos of London (can you ever have too many?).

cofAs I started to look at the options, and there are so many running options in London, I quickly realized that the challenge isn’t really going to be the running so much as one of logistics. Stephen, 3rd child, age 13, has so many rugby matches this Autumn I need to figure out how to be in two places at once. But I am a mother, I can do it! In fact, as I type I already have 3 runs under my belt. Two days before the Anne run, I went on the Street Art run with Secret London Runs (same week counts,cof I need all the events I can get!). Not only was it great to run through East London and find some incredible street art, we were filmed by a young, local woman who couldn’t believe we were doing such a crazy thing. Running! To see art! Later, one of the men in my group stopped to help a collapsed homeless man, “I am a first aider,” he explained. With impressive efficiency he established the man was breathing but unconscious and helped arrange for an ambulance, and then we carried on. London life.

cofYesterday morning I ran the Clapham Common 10k with Run Through UK. No watch, no earphones, nothing but London sunshine. And the peace of mind to enjoy it. A terrific medal too. It was then that I realized this isncof‘t really a challenge at all. It is a privilege. More than a privilege, a gift. I have the health, the time and perhaps most importantly, the freedom in which to make this happen. Suddenly a silly, self-indulgent idea becomes a feminist statement. Maya Angelou rings in my ears. “I am a woman PHENOMENALLY.” Now I do love that. Passionate about that. My London Passion. xxx

 

Instagram: @mylondonpassion

 

On Sculpture in the City….and my favourite House of Cards 97/100

DSC_6239 (2)I love public sculpture. The quality of a city can be judged by its sculpture, I believe. I was once lured to Chicago on the promise of Anish Kapoor’s Cloud. London, the best city in the world, is filled with sculpture. Some of it awful, but much of it fantastic. And for the last 7 years, the City of London has filled its streets with work by famous, ultra-famous artists, in 9 month rotations. Sculpture in the City, as the programme is called, apparently came about as a gentlemen’s bet by the head of Hiscox, the art insurers, at a industry dinner. Could he get artists to donate work to the City? No way, was the reaction. Watch me, was the response. And the rest, as they say, is history.  Not only do artists and galleries willingly donate the work, the selection committee gets more than a hundred offers every year. And why not? The chance to have your work showcased in the busiest part (Monday-Friday anyway) of the greatest city, to be admired by millions of sympathetic eyes…..an artists dream. Mine too. I love this programme. I look forward to the unveiling of the new selection each summer. Last year, I was fortunate enough to take a tour with one of the selection committee members. What a fascinating insight into the work, chosen at times for its potential reaction to the buildings around it as much forP1030307 (2) the work itself. The City is an incredible mix of the old and the new. Beautiful post great fire (1666) buildings up against brand new shiny towers with unfortunate post WWII construction in between. Stone and glass and cement, all under London’s changeable sky. Add some contemporary sculpture and this is for what Instagram was made.

P1030308Another of my favourite things is the morning after the night before in a city. Early  morning, streets empty of people but with the debris of nighttime fun still in evidence. An eerie calm with traces of raucous frivolity. The perfect atmosphere in which to admire art. With a rather vague map from the City of London downloaded on my phone I set off, with only the ubiquitous packs of builders as company. I found all 18 pieces, and dare I say, the overall affect was a little disappointing. Two of the works were part of last year’s group, Gavin Turk’s Ajar and Recycle Group’s Falling into Virtual Reality. I adore the Turk piece, photographed my children in it on our New Year’s Eve day outing, would be happy for it to live in the churchyard of St. Botolph’s without Bishopgate forever. Not sure, however, that is P1030318can be presented as part of a new series. Some of the others I just didn’t like as much as what had come before. For me, Paul McCarthy’s Apple Tree Girl Apple Tree Boy just wasn’t as engaging as Giuseppe Penone’s Idee di Pietra of last year, and with the Gherkin as the backdrop, you do want something rather fabulous. But fabulous is what Nathaniel Rackowe’s Expanded Black Shed looks like against the iconic building.

DSC_0049_4Sarah Lucas’s Florian/Kevin phallic vegetables, last year,  were such a pleasure on the eye and funny as well, but to everything  a season and the current season offers its own brand of humour. Not sure I was all that taken with Mhairi Vair’s Support for a Cloud, until I read that TimeOut (which did like them) suggested the Lloyd’s building had contracted a fungal infection or grown testes, depending on ones angle. This made me laugh out loud. Artist as interpreter of public opinion, surely. Similar wink and nod to Damien Hirst’s Temple, a giant medical model torso of a man. The worship of self has gotten more than one city boy in serious trouble over the decades.

Martin Creed’s plastic bags in the tree on Bishopsgate weren’t nearly as charming as LiziDSC_0007_11 (2) Sanchez’s party rings in the same tree (and Leadenhall Market), but then they weren’t meant to be. Creed may be making a big statement with his glorified rubbish, Sanchez was P1030306just having a bit of fun. But perhaps I am being too harsh. And a walk through the city is always worth doing, regardless of what you find. It was in this spirit that once finished with the sculpture trail I walked back on myself, to Broadgate. Because it is there that one of my most loved pieces of public art stands, permanently. Richard Serra’s rusty wedges with a gorgeous view of the sky from inside. P1030356 (2)Its official title is Fulcrum, but to me it is House of Cards, these big pieces of metal not quite leaning on each other, precariously defying gravity, unstable.  The perfect symbol for the financial capital of the world, upsetting as that truth may be.  Now that is great public sculpture. P1030358

On Chelsea Hospital and Turning Strangers into Friends….98/100

davA trait I have inherited from my father is the ability, no,  the compulsion to talk to strangers. I know my children hate it, my friends cringe, but I can’t help myself. Nor do I have any desire to curb this habit as it almost always turns out well, sometimes very well indeed. At the recent Chelsea Flower Show I began chatting with one of the Chelsea Pensioners, resplendent in his iconic red coat. I invited him to St. Paul’s. He came the following Tuesday. He invited me to lunch at the Royal Chelsea Hospital, the world famous home of the Pensioners. Friends welcome. And this is how Ange, Lizzie and I got to spend Monday, a gorgeous, sunny, beautiful, London summer day, at the Royal Hospital Chelsea. What a treat!

davCharles II, motivated, as much by admiration and envy of the French system,  as desire to do the right thing, in 1681, issued a Royal Warrant to build the Royal Hospital “for the succor and relief of Veterans broken by Age and War,” and more than 300 years on it is still going strong. It is a place of wonder and beauty and its Pensioners are the toast of the town, wherever they go. “Hospital”  in its original form means hospitality more than a place of medical care, and while there is a medical wing in the current complex, is was place in which to live out life with dignity, including a bed and meals, something many 17th century soldiers would have found to be the height of luxury. Expectations have changed and so has thedav Hospital, so that the  sense of luxury remains in tune with todays standards. So much so that my friend Ange and I are plotting how we too can get ourselves a spot. We need to wait ’til we are 65, bump off  the husbands and join the army. Ok, the first two are doable, the third a bit trickier but we are resourceful women. Because this place is gorgeous! GORGEOUS.

dav

 

The Wren Chapel is particularly stunning, built by the great man Christopher Wren of St. Paul’s fame himself, in the 1680s. It is still a local parish church, it was the church of Baroness Margaret Thatcher and Denis. They are both buried on the grounds. cof

 

Ok, the individual rooms are a bit cramped but the idea is that one spends a little time alone as possible. There are large common areas where games abound. Posters and flyers for outings are everywhere. The grounds are stunning. The bar is open from 10:30 am and that red coat. Oh how much I would like to swan round in a red coat like that. Would need to nick a few medals to pin to my chest, obviously, but otherwise I think I would look dashing. And London would fall at my feet. London falls at all the Pensioners’ feet, as well it should.

davYes, there are women in the hospital, since 2009.  Today there are 15. But they don’t get on with each other, we were told. We assumed this was just male hyberbole until Ange started chatting with the female pensioner in the gift shop. “We had a lovely tour of the Chapel from one of the other women, Xxxx.” “PHeffff” was the immediate response. “I don’t like her. No one likes her.” Ange was stunned into silence. Ok then. No group singing of “We are family, I’ve got all my  sisters with me,”  for this lot. But the men seem to get on. One of the gentlemen we met had recently been hugged, on television, by Jo Konta, at Wimbledon. The press were now after him. Are you “that man,” we joked (having been prompted  by Peter). Yes he acknowledged, with a smile, he was. But no autographs today. We all laughed. We laughed often on Monday. Peter told fantastic and funny stories of his life and his time in Chelsea. But there is a solemn side to it all as well. These are men and women who have seen conflict, of the most brutal kind. And many of their friends paid the highest price. Standing in the North Front is a larger than life statue of a Pensioner, arm raised, as if hailing a cab (it is Chelsea, after all). Around the base are the words Sir Jacob Astley spoke before the Battle of Edgehill in 1642, known as the Soldier’s Prayer: “O Lord you know how occupied I shall be this day. If I forget thee do not forget me.” Words that pierce the soul.

sdrBut this is not a sad place, not at all.  There is not any sense of what most of us generally feel when in an institution for older people: Despair. Chelsea Hospital tackles head on the great scourge of our modern times, especially for those in advancing years: loneliness. To be lonely here would take an effort. In a world that is becoming increasingly fractured and alienating, Royal Hospital Chelsea retains a tangible sense of community. A belonging. We should all be so lucky. There is a lot we could learn from this place. It was an honour and privilege to be invited in. A perfect London day indeed. dav

 

 

On Para Athletics and the Olympic Legacy…96/100

davOne of the many controversies surrounding the Olympic Games is the concept of “legacy.” Each city makes big promises. None deliver. None except London. London has done a fantastic job with the Olympic legacy. Sure, I have no doubt lots of people have lots of gripes, but overall it is something of which to be proud. Olympic Stadium now the home of West Ham. The aquatics complex in constant use by the public. Beautiful and popular Olympic Park. But the best legacy of all is the London attitude to disabled athletes. There isn’t a city in the world that can claim what we have. Popularity.

413539_516340165059376_890046018_oThink back to that dreamy summer of 2012. The Paralympics weren’t just attended, they weren’t just well attended, they were sold out. SOLD OUT. I saw more sports that I can even remember, and the venues were packed. Crowds cheering, flags waving, heroes made, breakfast television couches filled, more victims for the paparazzi. Of course, this could all have been just leftover euphoria from the incredibly successful Olympic games. Except that it lasted. It still exists.

It was not too much before the Olympics that I became involved in the charity Walking with the Wounded, an organization that helps soldiers with life-changing injuries create a new life in the civilian world. Through a friend I met the founder, my boys’ school chose them as their charity of the year, I ran the marathon for them in 2013. Later in 2013 I climbed Kilimanjaro, with 4 friends and a wounded serviceman, Ibi Ali. It was a phenomenal experience. Through Walking with the Wounded, injured ex-military have done extraordinary things. Artic Circle, Antarctica, Marathon des Sables and more.

In 2014 Prince Harry founded the Invictus Games, Olympic style games for wounded service people, first held in London. My Kili friends and I couldn’t buy tickets fast enough. But 10531422_948361465190575_3824424820928126635_owe weren’t  the only ones. Once again, the venues were crowded with loud, enthusiastic members of the public. Like the 2012 Olympics, the 2014 Invictus Games were a magical few days, finishing off with a concert in Olympic Park which may have been one of the best I have ever been to, not least because the line-up included my beloved Frank Turner and the10419582_947826481910740_2477249639805078664_n incomparable Foo Fighters. It is impossible not to feel overwhelmed with awe when the lyrics “learning to walk again” are being shouted by women and men with prosthetic legs who, on a bad day, can run far faster than I can on my best day. Inspiring indeed.

Fast forward a few years and while I don’t raise money for WWTW anymore (they have rather outgrown the efforts of Wandsworth women,) my interest in paraathletics has not dimmed. So I was delighted to attend the 2017 World Para Athletic Championships, in the previous Olympic stadium, now known as London Stadium, last Saturday night, with my younger two in tow. Happy to repeat myself in saying we weren’t alone. The stadium was plenty full. The people around me were knowledgeable about the competitors. The crowd went crazy when the British were on the track or field, even more so when they won. And win they did. Often.IMG-20170716-WA0004 (2) The highlight was the 200m…starring gold medal paralympian Richard Whitehead and Invictus superstar and bronze medal paralympian Dave Henson. They finished 1st and 3rd. The stadium roared. It roared again when Hollie Arnold broke the world record in the javelin. It roared when the Kenyans ran too. Actually the noise was consistently high throughout. Lots of Americans competed and won as well. When interviewed they all said the same  thing, that London was the “best, the BEST” place to compete. London’s legacy. Doesn’t get much better than that.